How MSHS Should Approach Climate Change

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How MSHS Should Approach Climate Change

Satellite image showing thick and thin sea ice.

Satellite image showing thick and thin sea ice.

Satellite image showing thick and thin sea ice.

Satellite image showing thick and thin sea ice.

Paige Laurie, Junior Reporter

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As The New York Times recently reported in “Will We Survive Climate Change?“, The Paris Climate Accord has the goal of stopping global temperatures rising by two degrees Celsius. Arctic sea ice is continuously more likely to disappear over the summer, and 37% of the world’s population is exposed to extreme heat waves. However, “climate change is not pass-fail,” according to Kate Marvel, a research scientist.

Many kids that know about climate change believe that it’s too late to do anything about it and this will be the end. If schools shine a light on this topic and teach students what they can do, this might bring about a new age of scientists that can make and keep our planet better and cleaner. Schools should do their part with classes, clubs or programs with the purpose of doing things like planting trees so kids can feel like they helped a good cause and realize that it’s not hard to do their part.

Manitou Springs School District should help educate students that climate change isn’t hopeless and can still be stopped. There should be information on what students can do to lessen their impact and ways to motivate them to preserve a better planet.

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