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Matt+Rogge+enjoys+a+gentle+Rampart+Reservoir+during+his+visit+to+paddle+board%2C+just+to+get+away+from+the+hustle+and+bustle+of+life.

Lairden Rogge

Matt Rogge enjoys a gentle Rampart Reservoir during his visit to paddle board, just to get away from the hustle and bustle of life.

Matt Rogge: English

Matt Rogge, an English teacher at Manitou Springs High School, turned in his resignation letter on March 8, 2022. He decided to do this for multiple reasons; most significantly, Rogge chose not to pursue his professional teaching license during the pandemic. “I decided not to pursue my teaching license,” Rogge said. “I feel like my life experiences and education have prepared me to be a valuable teacher.”

I’m hesitant to leave knowing that many students need more than what they are getting in school. And I think I’ve been an important part of giving them that for the time I’ve been at MSHS.”

— Matt Rogge

Rogge first came to MSHS in the transitioning period between 2019 and 2020 due to a personnel issue in the English department. When the English teacher he was subbing for resigned mid-year, he filled in as a long-term substitute on a substitute license.  Later that year, after getting a taste of full-time teaching and building connections with students, he applied for the position. Rogge taught the 2020-2021 school year on an emergency license. Then, during the 2021-2022 school year, with a “Statement of Assurance” with MSSD14, he began the process of getting a professional teaching license through an alternative licensure program. This process was complicated by COVID and a car accident and led to Rogge’s decision to not pursue the professional teaching license required for his job.

Rogge taught English classes full time at MSHS from 2020-2022. He has seemed to enjoy his time and isn’t easily walking out, as he has some hesitations. 

“I’m hesitant to leave knowing that many students need more than what they are getting in school,” Rogge said. “And I think I’ve been an important part of giving them that for the time I’ve been at MSHS.”

I will continue to substitute teach, coach and do leadership consulting with various professional and education organizations.”

— Matt Rogge

Although he is hesitant, this choice seems better for him as he does not want to go through the training program, which is necessary to have the teaching license he needs to continue to teach at MSHS.  “I ultimately realized that my time was more valuable than sitting in a classroom and listening to many lessons and material that I had previously learned and could teach myself,” Rogge said. Due to this, he believes this decision will help give him more time to pursue what makes him happy in life.

“I’m back in the groove and feeling like anything is possible, literally,” Rogge said. As for his next steps in life, Rogge has mentioned staying with leadership, coaching and subbing while exploring his free time with activities.

“I will continue to substitute teach, coach and do leadership consulting with various professional and education organizations,” Rogge said. “I will probably have time to do more endurance racing events and go on a few more surf trips with other friends and key people in my life.”

Although Rogge seems content with his decision, the students and faculty may have a different view. Nick Marro (12) is currently enrolled in Rogge’s Yearbook and English IV classes. He has grown to build a professional relationship with Rogge. He has gotten to know him a bit better. Marro has learned a lot from Rogge and values his presence.

“When it comes to Rogge, he is a good teacher but also a good person and mature figure,” Marro said. “It feels like he actually cares about you and the learning process you go through.”

It is evident that Rogge has left an impact on the students and touched their hearts with his teaching methods. Marro believes that this absence will affect the following year’s students as Rogge is not being replaced.

“This will definitely affect next year’s students. Rogge has a certain style of teaching that is different from others,” Marro said. “Focusing on ideals and a walkthrough method of teaching focused on opinions instead of heard facts that you could simply find on the internet. Rogge had us dive deep into books, movies, articles, journals and global events having no wrong answer. Rogge wanted us to dive into personal thought and morals.” 

Marro feels that Rogge’s type of person isn’t as easily replaced as the position is, as he would teach alternative methods to better the mind instead of the memory.

When it comes to Rogge, he is a good teacher but also a good person and mature figure. It feels like he actually cares about you and the learning process you go through.”

— Nick Marro (12)

“What made Rogge special was he’s not a fill-in teacher. He’s not just here to read the curriculum and leave,” Marro said. “Mr. Rogge actually teaches and cares and deserves a lot more than what some would choose to give. He will be missed and taught me a lot.”

As for the faculty, Jessica Moen, an English teacher and English Department Chair, echoes Marro in the effect of Rogge’s resignation.

“I’m saddened by his upcoming absence because he’s such a nice individual,” Moen said. “He shows up for kids in a way that you don’t always see in a staff member. So I think he makes such strong connections on a personal level with students. We’re gonna miss him a lot.”

Rogge has been a big part of the community in the last two and a half years, making many friendships with faculty and students. It seems inevitable that he will miss many things here, but predictable by his personality. He said that he is going to miss being there for others.  “Seeing everyone and hearing about their challenges and accomplishments and sharing in that will be what I miss most,” Rogge said. 

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